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My time travel for whales and dolphins

My time travel for whales and dolphins

Pamela Styles is one of our brilliant volunteers, giving talks in schools about whales and...
What does coronavirus mean for the future of fishing and our efforts to prevent dolphin deaths in nets?

What does coronavirus mean for the future of fishing and our efforts to prevent dolphin deaths in nets?

Bycatch is the biggest global killer of dolphins, porpoises and whales – hundreds of thousands...
Our lockdown home heroes

Our lockdown home heroes

Like most charities, our fundraising events have been cancelled and, whilst we hope they’ll go...
Coronavirus and New Zealand dolphins: many questions, few answers

Coronavirus and New Zealand dolphins: many questions, few answers

Like people over the world, New Zealanders have recently been faced with a lot of...
Whaling: an inconvenient truth – the hunters are not only killing whales, they are killing us too.

Whaling: an inconvenient truth – the hunters are not only killing whales, they are killing us too.

As we hope for an end to the coronavirus crisis, we should reflect on another...
How we’re helping to keep orcas safe from capture in Russia

How we’re helping to keep orcas safe from capture in Russia

In 1999, we helped open up whale research in Russia, building a photo-ID catalogue of...
Outrage as Norway’s government says its whalers are ‘essential workers’

Outrage as Norway’s government says its whalers are ‘essential workers’

If you are able to help with a donation it would mean the world right...
Life in lockdown – is this what captivity for whales and dolphins is like?

Life in lockdown – is this what captivity for whales and dolphins is like?

If you are able to help with a donation it would mean the world right...

Christmas…how to get it wrapped without plastic

It’s that time of year again when there’s only one thing on most people’s minds – and in the shops, on the radio, everywhere you turn. Yes, we mean Christmas. And with Christmas comes presents, and presents means wrapping. Lots of wrapping…

However, much of the wrapping paper and tape available on the high street contains plastic and can’t be recycled. It’s best to leave it on the shop shelves.

plastic free wrapping graphic

If you are not sure if your wrapping paper is recyclable, try the ‘crunch test’. Crunch the paper into a ball and, if it stays in a ball it’s recyclable but if it unfurls itself, it contains plastic and cannot be recycled.

So, what can you use instead? We’ve trawled the web and here are a few lovely, plastic-free alternatives:

  • Use recycled wrapping paper. Check out the Plastic Free Shop here for ideas
  • Furoshiki, the ancient Japanese art of using fabric to wrap presents

Use newspaper – especially the cartoon section – or brown paper and string. If you don’t like plain brown paper, decorate it with stamps or paint or use buttons, felt, flowers, cinnamon sticks, pine cones, dried orange slices, real holly/ivy and wax to decorate them.

Above are some lovely examples from left to right by Helen Philipps, Natalia Kostyrya, Denise Mingachos and Trinette Reed Above are some lovely examples from left to right by Helen Philipps, Natalia Kostyrya, Denise Mingachos and Trinette Reed

  • Use plastic-free tape like this. If you’re not keen on brown tape, you could decorate it with stamps or paint
  • Make and use Danish heart baskets. You can make them from paper, card, felt or fabric in different sizes
  • Use reusable gift fabric wraps like these
  • Or if you can sew, create little bags for your gifts

Happy wrapping!

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