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New blue whale population discovered

New blue whale population discovered

A previously unknown population of blue whales has been found living in the Indian Ocean after researchers picked up and recorded  an unrecognised song travelling hundreds of miles through the sea. Blue whale vocalisations are very low and can reach other whales through the water up to 500 miles away, but each population has their…

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Blue whale sightings increase off South Georgia

New research suggests that blue whales may finally be returning to South Georgia decades after the end of whaling. The waters around the island in the South Atlantic were the location for some of the most devastating impacts of commercial whaling. Over 40,000 blue whales were killed during the first part of the 20th century…

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Blue whales in New Zealand prefer to hang out in cooler waters

Researchers from Oregon State University studying blue whales in the South Taranaki bight, New Zealand have found a link between the whales, their feeding and changes in water temperatures. The findings, published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series, reveal how certain conditions play a part in where the whales are and availability of their prey…

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Blue whales in New Zealand found to be genetically distinct

Blue whales have long been known to frequent the waters around New Zealand but now scientists have discovered that the whales living between the North and South islands appear to be a genetically distinct population.  A survey in 2014 by a team from the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State University identified around 50 blue…

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Blue whale © Andrew Sutton

Blue whale

See all species The blue whale is one of nature’s most magnificent and graceful beings. Louder, larger, longer and heavier than any other creature, it’s a multi-record breaker and a totem of conservation for all whales and dolphins. We must ask ourselves: if we can’t save the blue whale, what hope is there? Other names:…

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Whales go from 'right-handed' to left

Scientist studying blue whale feeding habits have documented a switch from ‘right-hand’ to left when these huge creatures feed. Blue whales are similar to many other creatures when it comes to ‘handeness’ or laterality.  They tend to always favour the right. However, results from a six year study of their behaviour off the coast of…

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