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Common bottlenose dolphin wild and free © Tim Stenton

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A Magical Seabed Safari

  Journalist Hans Peter Roth shares his final blog from his recent trip to the Faroe Islands. 12 hours before I did not even dream of it. Now I am in a beautiful little cove in Hoyvík near the capital Tórshavn. On top the sun comes out of the clouds. The night before I’d met…

Number of species of cetacean now extinct 2 (?) – China 0

Despite being declared a Chinese “national treasure” and being protected since 1975, the world looked on in sorrow when the baiji (otherwise known as the Yangtze river dolphin) was declared extinct in 2007. The baiji, the first species of cetacean to become extinct at the hands of mankind but sadly, very likely not the last. …

An evening in the 'Last Ocean'

I have just spent an incredible evening with Erich Hoyt, Rob Lott, Peter Hall, Mel Salmon and a cinema full of friends and colleagues with the Director of the Last Ocean. It was great catching up with some old friends, such as Claire Bass, Richard Page and Barbara Mass. This film is an incredible exposé…

A guest blog on the issues at the ICJ by Dr Sidney Holt

Thoughts on the case about ‘scientific whaling’ brought to the International Court of Justice by the Government of Australia against the Government of Japan by Sidney Holt By the end of the first week of hearings on this case in The Hague that began at the end of June, several excellent commentaries had been posted on…

It’s 1999 all over again

Japan’s arguments in the ICJ today reminded me of the 1999 ruling by the International Tribunal For the Law of the Sea with respect to Japan’s proposal to start ‘scientific tuna fishing’ for endangered Southern Bluefin tuna. Recently,  Scientific American discussed the fact that Japan is not regulating some of its own fisheries on scientific…

Japan’s strategy is a simple one – get around the IWC Commission

For many years we have been concerned that Japan has been trying to bypass the IWC Commission, the actual decision making body, and seek to load the Scientific Committee with it’s own scientists and invited friends, – and then rely on their support for its expanding commercial whaling programmes. Greenland and Denmark are currently trying…