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Common bottlenose dolphin wild and free © Tim Stenton

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Can ANYONE stop Alma?!

It is hard not to feel despondent as I track the small green triangle that is the Alma via the Marine Traffic site. Last month, reports suggested that Kristjan Loftsson personally supervised the loading of her cargo of 2,000 tonnes of Icelandic whale meat (mostly fin whale, we believe) at Hafnafjordur harbour, south of Reykjavik,…

Why Norway should just let whaling die

  Today, I have the pleasure of introducing a guest blog from long-term WDC supporter and volunteer speaker, Clare McEnally. Clare’s relationship with WDC began 16 years ago when she went dolphin watching with her family in Scotland. Clare speaks some Norwegian and has spent time living in Norway, engaging, as she puts it, in countless discussions…

Reykjavik’s maverick mayor speaks up for live whales

Three cheers for current mayor of Reykjavik, Jon Gnarr, for being so refreshingly honest and open in his opinions, unfettered by the personal or corporate agendas which routinely bedevil most public figures who deliver only the party line and often leave us wondering how much, if anything, they genuinely mean. Jon is a breath of…

Slippery surprises and Spring-time smells arrive at the Scottish Dolphin Centre

Many changes have taken place at Spey Bay in the last few weeks, from small to large, colours, smells and sounds! Numerous plant species are now bursting into flower. If you take a walk down the river track you can spot red campion, greater stitchwort, pink purselane, lupin, smiths pepperwort and much more. New smells…

That‘s just “quackers” …

Back in the 1960’s submarines detected a bizarre “quacking” sound in the southern ocean and have been perplexed as to its origins ever since. The noise – nicknamed the “bio-duck” – was only heard during winter and spring months and was attributed to everything from ships to fish, but no-one really knew what was making…

Sometimes they can go free

Last week we received news that two of the three former captive bottlenose dolphins that were rehabilitated and released back into the wild last July near Jeju Island were sighted alive and well off the coast of South Korea.  Captured from a local and vulnerable population of Indo-pacific bottlenose dolphins and then sold illegally to Pacificland…