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An orca swimming free in Iceland
Icelandic hunting vessels in port

Permit delays could stop whale hunts in Iceland this summer

As whaling ships go out to hunt for another season in Norway, news from Iceland...
Blue whale tail Christopher Swann

Māori king declares rights for whales in New Zealand

New Zealand's Māori king and other native leaders across the Pacific region have signed a...
Orca-Morgan-LoroParque-2013_c_UCLudewig (1)

More success for our End Captivity campaign. Jet2holidays stops promoting dolphin shows

Jet2holidays has followed easyJet's recent announcement and become the latest major tour operator in the...
Dolphin in captivity

Tests reveal captive dolphin choked to death on fake seaweed

Nephele, a dolphin held at Kolmården Zoo in Sweden has died after a piece artificial...

Shocking footage of captive orca butting head against wall

Distressing scenes have recently emerged from Marineland in Ontario where Kiska, the loneliest whale in the world, has been filmed violently thrashing her head against the side of her tank.

Kiska is a wild caught Icelandic orca who has spent the last four decades in captivity. She was just three years old when she was taken from her family and condemned to a life in a barren, concrete tank. The disturbing images that have gone viral on social media show how a life in captivity for over forty years has severely impacted her social and psychological development. Kiska has been without an orca companion since 2011 and is deprived of every aspect of the social culture she would have experienced in the wild.

Orcas, and indeed all whales and dolphins, are extremely poor candidates for life in captivity as no tank environment can ever provide the conditions that these free-ranging, powerful, highly intelligent and socially complex creatures need to thrive.

Never has there been a greater urgency for Kiska to be retired to a coastal, open water sanctuary where she can enjoy the rest of her days in a more natural environment….and hopefully in the company of other ex-captive orcas.

Find out more about orcas in captivity

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About George Berry

George is a member of WDC's Communications team and website coordinator.

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