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Watching dolphins from the beach in Scotland: WDC/Charlie Phillips

Lockdown is lifting and the beach is calling – if you see a whale or dolphin how will you behave?

We have all become more aware of giving one another space and respecting social distancing....
Risso's dolphins are captured in Taiji hunt. Image: LIA and Dolphin Project

Heartbreak and practical action – the horror of the Taiji dolphin hunts and one Japanese activist’s determination

Back in November, I shared my heartache at the drama unfolding in the waters off...
Common Dolphin

Goodbye Bycatch – what have we achieved and what’s next?

Thank you to everyone who's got involved with our campaign to stop dolphins, porpoises and...
Haul of sea bass on French pair trawlers, Le Baron and Magellan, fishing in the English channel. Greenpeace is currently in the English channel protesting against pelagic pair trawling due to the high numbers of dolphin deaths associated with it.

Seaspiracy

Ali and Lucy Tabrizi's Netflix film Seaspiracy is compelling viewing for anyone who cares for...
Porpoise, Conwy Wales. WDC

Why do porpoises and dolphins find it so difficult to avoid fishing nets?

When a dolphin or porpoise is caught or entangled in fishing gear it's known as...
WDC NA

Reflection – what this remarkable whale teaches us about humpbacks and their fascinating lives

Reflection, like all humpback whales, was born with a unique black and white pattern on...

Meet the brainiacs of the underwater world – deep thinkers with intricate emotional lives

Whales and dolphins have big brains, and large brained beings have a few things in...

Growing up with the amazing Adelaide Port River dolphins

Squeak, one of the Port River dolphins If you are able to make a donation,...

What am I grateful for in 2020? Whales, dolphins, and you

Like many other people, my 2020 has included many phases -  from the incredibly optimistic phase, the nervous to leave my house phase, the haven’t-worn-trousers-without-an-elasticated-waist phase, the figuring out video meetings phase to the thinking my dogs are the only ones who understand me phase.

Michelle

One of the phases that I went through involved obsessively trying to stay on top of everything happening outside of the four walls of my house and constantly checking the latest headlines. Needless to say, that was overwhelming and quickly became counterproductive.

That is until one day when I saw a different kind of article that piqued my interest. This article covered the psychology of a prolonged period of stress and how it affects our brains and our bodies. The scientist in me was completely fascinated by the facts but I also realised it was currently and very actively happening to me. I wasn’t the exception and I quickly needed to make a change.

‘Take one minute every day and think of three things that you are grateful for.’

I had heard the advice many times, but I had always dismissed it. It seemed like it was unnecessary and just too simple to have a real effect. But then I started doing it.

For the first couple of days, I went for the seemingly obvious ones - I am grateful for my family, my friends, my health, and my home. As the days went on, I started to branch out - I am grateful for my favourite iced coffee, for true-crime podcasts, and my fuzziest socks.

So why am I telling you all of this?

Because I can't even begin to tell you how many times you have been on my gratitude list.

I am incredibly grateful that you love whales and dolphins and that you have chosen to support WDC with a donation that you worked really hard to earn, and that you have invested in our work to protect whales and dolphins.

I am grateful that when conservation feels like such a big and overwhelming concept, you are there to remind me to take it one step at a time and focus on doing the next right thing.

I am grateful for the supportive messages you send us and I am grateful that you have chosen for whales and dolphins to be part of your life.

humpback hug flipped

While this year has been full of the unexpected, it was also filled with projects that your support made happen. Thank you for the incredible impact you have made. You helped us create the world’s first beluga sanctuary in Iceland in partnership with the SEA LIFE Trust, and here in the US, you helped endangered Southern Resident orcas and gave them a voice. In the UK you helped persuade the Scottish government to create protected areas for whales. This is only a snapshot of what you have made possible - we’ll share more with you in January, but I hope this helps remind you that you did some amazing things this year.

Lastly, I am deeply grateful to everyone who made incredibly generous donations throughout this year. You inspired us with new and creative ways of fundraising virtually and in these strange and difficult times, we appreciate everyone who gives what they can. We know that giving comes in many forms - whether you make a donation, adopt an orca, whale or dolphin, play our raffle, share a post on social media, sign a petition or fundraise for us… whatever you do, we appreciate you and are grateful for our shared love of whales and dolphins.

If you're grateful for whales and dolphins

please help them with a donation.

Thank you!

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