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Third orca death in 18 months at theme park

Loro Parque tourist attraction in Tenerife, Spain has announced the death of Kohana, a 20-year-old...

WDC’s Shorewatch work shortlisted for nature award

We are thrilled that our Shorewatch programme has been shortlisted in the Citizen Science category...
Image from one of the WDC Risso's dolphin research catalogues

Local community helps piece together Risso’s dolphin puzzle

Thousands of photographs from members of the public have been published today in two WDC...

Tesco joins new initiative to help protect whales and dolphins

Tesco, the UK's largest retailer has joined WDC, Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), and the Royal Society...

Tahlequah the orca has a new calf

Tahlequah (J35), an orca from the Southern Resident population, has given birth to a new calf (J57). They were seen swimming together at the end of last week by scientists from the Center for Whale Research.

In 2018 Tahlequah made international headlines after she was seen swimming over 1000 miles over a period of two weeks with the body of her previous calf after the young whale died.

Tahlequah belongs to the J pod of endangered Southern Resident orcas that live in the waters stretching between Washington State in the US and British Columbia in Canada. Along with the K and L pods, the total population is currently only 73 orcas.

There are many threats the whales face, in particular the loss of salmon, their favourite prey, in the waters where they live. Every calf is an important addition to the population, though the mortality rate for orca calves is around 40%.

So far, the new calf appears to be healthy and precocious, swimming vigorously alongside Tahlequah.

Find out more about our work to protect the Southern Resident orcas.

J35 with her new calf J57.
Tahlequah (J35) with her calf J57. Photo by Katie Jones, Center for Whale Research / Permit #21238

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These endangered orcas urgently need our help. Your support will help our efforts to protect their home and ensure their long-term survival. Thank you.

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About George Berry

George is a member of WDC's Communications team and website coordinator.

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