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Photo exhibition gives stunning insight into beluga move

Image of Little White and Little Grey from Olympus exhibition

A photographic exhibition at London’s After Nyne Gallery has opened this week giving visitors the chance to see some incredible images that document the journey of two beluga whales (Little Grey and Little White) from a captive facility in China to begin a new life in an ocean sanctuary in Iceland.

This is the world’s first open water whale sanctuary, created by SEA LIFE Trust in partnership with WDC, and the gallery will display the work of leading wildlife photographer and Olympus ambassador, Tesni Ward who photographed what is one of the biggest developments in captive whale care in decades, and a pathway to the ending of whale and dolphin captivity shows for public entertainment.

Ward travelled to both Shanghai and Iceland, following the historic moment the whales left a water park in Shanghai for the remote island of Heimaey in Iceland.

The whales who safely arrived after their 30+ hour epic journey by land, sea and air, are now in their temporary care pool facility, preparing for the next part of their move (a mere 1430 meters), which will take place in the warmer/calmer months of spring 2020.

The bay which measures 32,000 sqm, with a depth of up to 10m has been chosen to provide a more natural sub-Arctic environment and is full of natural flora and fauna for these amazing whales to call home.

The exhibition runs from 11th to 20th December.

Learn more about the sanctuary project HERE

Donate and support WDC’s sanctuary work

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