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Russia to give orcas greater protection

Russia to give orcas greater protection

According to reports, Viktoria Abramchenko, the Deputy Prime Minister in Russia responsible for environmental affairs,...
Good news from Greece on the captivity front

Good news from Greece on the captivity front

The authorities in Attica, the Greek region that encompasses the city of Athens, have taken...
Japanese whale research ship returns with no whales on board

Japanese whale research ship returns with no whales on board

The first Japanese vessel to carry out whale research in the Antarctic Ocean since the...
WDC Scottish Dolphin Centre temporary closure

WDC Scottish Dolphin Centre temporary closure

Due to the ongoing situation with Covid 19 and our concern for the safety and...

New State of Nature report paints worrying picture for UK wildlife

Long-beaked common dolphin

A new State of Nature report has revealed that losses to all animals, plants and marine life over the past few decades shows no sign of improving and that over 40% of species have decreased in abundance, while just 26% have increased.

The report uses vast amounts of data collected from tens of thousands of expert volunteers and highlights bycatch (the incidental capture of marine creatures) as a serious issue for some species like harbour porpoise and common dolphin. It is estimated that 1,500 small whales, dolphins and porpoises are caught as bycatch each year, as well as a growing number of humpback and minke whales recorded as entangled in ropes from pots on the seabed in the waters around Scotland.

The UK has international commitments to reduce this kind of bycatch to as close to zero as possible, yet bycatch of several species is causing considerable concern.

Currently between 0.5% and 5% of UK fishing activity is monitored at sea, which varies by activities.  Observer programmes are the main source of monitoring data, but other data sources, including cameras, acoustic and satellite options, could be used more effectively to improve the problem of bycatch.

The report also cites a range of human activities in the marine environment as threat to marine mammals, such as marine plastics, underwater noise pollution and contaminants.

 

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Russia to give orcas greater protection

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