Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching
Games developers rally to help us end lockdown for whales and dolphins

Games developers rally to help us end lockdown for whales and dolphins

©️ Christopher Swann We are so pleased to announce that our recent games promotion with...
WDC and Special Effect bag incredible donation from GAME

WDC and Special Effect bag incredible donation from GAME

Photo by Scott Portelli The UK’s leading high street games retailer, GAME has donated over...
The Boys are back in town! Dynamite Comics’ Humble Bundle is extended for 2 more weeks

The Boys are back in town! Dynamite Comics’ Humble Bundle is extended for 2 more weeks

©️ Christopher Swann The recent Humble Comics Bundle from the publishers of comic book series,...
Rescuers try to persuade whales to leave loch ahead of military exercise

Rescuers try to persuade whales to leave loch ahead of military exercise

Northern bottlenose whale © https://www.facebook.com/SteveTruluckAtSea/ A rescue team and local volunteers are urgently working to...

Microplastics found in brains of crabs is cause for alarm

plastikmuell-strand-web

Researchers at the University of Brighton have carried out the world’s first study into microplastics in the brains of a crustacean species, which could have wider implications for other marine creatures like whales and dolphins.

After feeding polystyrene fluorescent microplastic spheres to mussels, the researchers then fed these mussels to velvet swimming crabs.

The stomach, gills, testes and brains of the crab were sampled one hour, one day, seven days and 21 days after the mussels were consumed. Microplastics were present in all tissues sampled but, whereas the crab’s stomach and gills showed a decrease in in the amount of microplastics over time, the number of microplastics present in the brain remained constant.

The presence of microplastics in the brain has possible implications for a range of behaviours for these creatures, including predator avoidance, foraging and reproduction.

The amount of plastic pollution feeding into rivers and then out to the ocean is a growing problem for marine creatures likes whales and dolphins

The way some feed means that there is the potential for them to take in substantial amounts of microplastic (less than 5mm wide) floating in the water.

Exposure to these plastic-associated toxins poses a major threat to the health of these whales as they can interfere with growth and development, metabolism, and reproduction.

For more on plastic pollution and how you can help visit WDC’S NOTWHALEFOOD site. BE A PLASTIC HERO! Plastic is #NotWhaleFood.

Related News

Games developers rally to help us end lockdown for whales and dolphins

Games developers rally to help us end lockdown for whales and dolphins

©️ Christopher Swann We are so pleased to announce that our recent games promotion with Humble Bundle has raised an amazing $8,000 for WDC. The global pandemic...
Will we ever see an end to whale and dolphin captures in Russia?

Will we ever see an end to whale and dolphin captures in Russia?

The infamous whale jail on Russia’s Far East coast stands empty. Between late summer 2018 and November 2019, more than 100 wild-caught beluga whales and...
WDC and Special Effect bag incredible donation from GAME

WDC and Special Effect bag incredible donation from GAME

Photo by Scott Portelli The UK’s leading high street games retailer, GAME has donated over £35,000 to charity through sales of their in-store bags. GAME...
What was it like to be in the rescue team at the Tasmania pilot whale stranding?

What was it like to be in the rescue team at the Tasmania pilot whale stranding?

Dr Maddie Brasier is a marine biologist at the University of Tasmania and member of the Wildcare Tasmania Whale Rescue Volunteer First Response Team having...

Leave a Comment