All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
WDC in talks with New Zealand‘s Minister for Conservation over dolphin protection

WDC in talks with New Zealand‘s Minister for Conservation over dolphin protection

WDC team meets NZ Minister for Conservation Representatives from Whale and Dolphin Conservation have met...
Success! We campaigned to stop British Airways selling tickets to SeaWorld – and now they have!

Success! We campaigned to stop British Airways selling tickets to SeaWorld – and now they have!

More fantastic news for our End Captivity campaign has emerged with the announcement from British...
First Bryde’s whale auction held after Japan resumes commercial hunts

First Bryde’s whale auction held after Japan resumes commercial hunts

An auction of Bryde’s whale meat has taken place in Japan, the first since the Japanese...
Ecuador introduces welcome measures to prevent dolphin imports for captivity shows

Ecuador introduces welcome measures to prevent dolphin imports for captivity shows

The Government of Ecuador has modified environmental legislation to prohibit the import of marine mammals...

Research shows great white sharks will avoid orca encounters

Orca spyhop

New research from scientists in the US has revealed that great white sharks will leave their feeding grounds to avoid contact with orcas (killer whales).

While this avoidance behaviour had been observed on individual occasions, this is the first time it has been studied over a long period of time to see if it was a regular occurrence.

Much of the data comes from studies of great white sharks in the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of California. The sharks visit the waters around the island to hunt young elephant seals.

However, occasionally transient orcas will also turn up and when this happens, the sharks leave the area until the following season. As a result, attacks on the elephant seals drops off during these events.

Even though the seals are a potential prey for the orcas, the sharks can be a target too despite being over five metres in length. In 1997, two orcas attacked and killed a young shark in the area, while more recently, at least five great whites were hunted by orcas off the coast of South Africa. The liver of a shark is full of calories so is a rich source of energy for the whales.

For the full report:
Killer whales redistribute white shark foraging pressure on seals
Salvador J. Jorgensen, Scot Anderson, Francesco Ferretti, James R. Tietz, Taylor Chapple, Paul Kanive, Russell W. Bradley, Jerry H. Moxley & Barbara A. Block
Nature.com Scientific Reports

Great white shark

Leave a Comment