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Fin whale (balaenoptera physalus) Gulf of California.

From managing commercial slaughter to saving the whale – the International Whaling Commission at 75

Governments come together under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to make decisions...
Two beautiful Hector's dolphins leap just off new Zealand's coast.

Progress for our campaign as New Zealand takes action to protect dolphins from fishing nets

Following our long-running campaign to save endangered Hector's dolphins, the New Zealand government has announced...

COP26: Did we persuade world leaders to listen to the ocean?

As the dust settles after the United Nations Climate Change conference in Glasgow, it's a...
Artist impression Ramiri's beaked whale

New whale species found

Kidzone - quick links Fun Facts Our Goals Curious kids Kids blogs Fantastic fundraisers Gallery...
This dolphin was trapped in a plastic ring but, thankfully, successfully freed. Photograph was taken by Q. Gibson, University of North Florida, under the authority of NMFS LOC No. 14157

To save whales, dolphins and the world, we need a global treaty on plastic pollution

Millions of tonnes of plastic enter the environment every year impacting ecosystems and species. Plastic...
Humpback whale Salt with her calf

A humpback whale teacher named Salt who helps keep you and me alive

Salt is a remarkable whale. In fact she's probably the most famous humpback whale in...
Blue whale (balaenoptera musculus) A blue whale tail at sunset. Gulf of California.

Whales, trees and butterflies – how we’re giving a voice to the ocean at COP26

I'm in Glasgow representing WDC, Whale and Dolphin Conservation at COP26, the UN's 26th climate...
Save the whale. Save the world

Green whale – will whale poo help save whales?

Kidzone - quick links Fun Facts Our Goals Curious kids Did you know that whales...

New Southern resident orca born!

The endangered population of orcas known as the Southern Residents were causing quite a stir in Washington State’s Puget Sound last week, with news helicopters broadcasting aerial images of the orcas.  A few eagle-eyed viewers noticed a particularly small orca swimming amongst the others, but blurry stills and screen-grabs from the news footage made it hard to know for sure if we were seeing a brand new calf. 

But just a glimpse was enough to stir everyone’s interest, and on Thursday night, the conversation to figure out what we were seeing was fast and furious – my phone was buzzing with messages.  After a particularly rough couple of years for the Southern Resident orca population, we were all desperate for some good news.

On Friday, the Center for Whale Research (CWR), which has maintained the Southern Resident census for over 40 years, confirmed that there was indeed a  brand new calf in the Southern Resident community!  Given the identification number L124, the new calf (sex unknown) was born to Matia (L77), a 31-year-old female in L pod.  CWR added that new baby L124 is Matia’s third known calf, looked healthy and energetic, and is believed to be several weeks old.  Finally, some good news!

The Southern Resident community has not had a surviving calf in more than three years, after the hopeful baby boom of a few years ago that started with the birth of Scarlet (J50) in December 2014.  Of the eight calves born who lived long enough to receive official designations from CWR, five are still alive today. 

Then, last autumn, three female orcas – one in each pod: J, K, and L – were observed by researchers to be pregnant and L124 is the first calf to be seen. This is such a welcome relief for all of us in the orca community and a piece of good news for the Southern Residents.  Even the orcas themselves seem to be celebrating, with members of all three pods seen socialising and in close contact with each other last Friday afternoon – a rare ‘superpod’ of Southern Residents.  

I’m thrilled and relieved by the news of a brand new calf.  L124 is an inspiration for me to keep up the hard work to ensure he or she has a safe and healthy home to grow up in – with clean and quiet waters and all the salmon they can dream of.  A few names have already been suggested for this newest Southern Resident orca, and while L124 won’t receive an official name until later this year, we like the idea of Promise – new calves indicate there is still promise for recovery in the population, and, with your support, we promise to do everything we can to help them get there.

Enjoy this video of the L pod of the Southern Residents, including L124.

Southern Resident video