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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

With the very real prospect of Iceland's only fin whale hunter, Kristján Loftsson sending boats...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Long-finned pilot whale

Fishermen in Norway eat pilot whale after entanglement in net

According to local reports, fishermen in Norway ate meat from a long-finned pilot whale after...

Dead orca calf found on Shetland beach after recent storm

The body of a young male orca calf has been discovered washed up on Shetland following Storm Caroline which struck the UK earlier this month.

The strength of the storm had left the body 25 metres from the shoreline. It appears the orca had become detached from his pod as winds reached over 90mph. 

It is unclear if any other factors played a part in his death but there are serious concerns about the impact of pollution on whales and dolphins around the UK coastline.

Earlier this year, results were released from an autopsy carried out on the body of Lulu, a member of the British Isle’s only resident orca pod, whose body was found on a beach on the island of Tiree in the Hebrides.

According to samples taken from Lulu’s blubber, the levels of PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) contamination were 20 times higher than safe levels for whales and dolphins.

WDC described the findings as a wake up call at the time: “We must ask ourselves how much we value our oceans and the majestic creatures that call it home.

“We have a duty to future generations to now fully implement meaningful conservation measures to make sure the tragic story of Lulu and her family is a turning point in our attitude and understanding towards the marine environment and not seen as an inevitable historical footnote.”

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About George Berry

George is a member of WDC's Communications team and website coordinator.