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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

With the very real prospect of Iceland's only fin whale hunter, Kristján Loftsson sending boats...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Long-finned pilot whale

Fishermen in Norway eat pilot whale after entanglement in net

According to local reports, fishermen in Norway ate meat from a long-finned pilot whale after...

Illegal dolphin export gang members arrested in the Solomon Islands

Police and fisheries officials in the Solomon Islands have warned local people not to get involved the illegal capture of dolphins after 14 suspects were arrested on suspicion of operating a ring that traps dolphins to sell overseas.

Earlier this month 20 dolphins were rescued and released from captivity in Rapata Village in Kolombangara Island.

For many years, the Solomons were a source of dolphins for theme parks and other captivity facilities. But, after years of campaigning by anti captivity groups, the Solomons government finally banned the capture and export of dolphins in 2012.

The practice still persists with people reportedly earning around 100,000 Solomon Island dollars, or about $US13, 000, for each live dolphin sold and exported.

Under local laws the penalty for attempting to export dolphins can be a £500,000 fine and/or a two-year prison sentence. In 2016  around 30 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins that had been illegally captured in the Solomon Islands were released back to the wild.