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Uncovering the dark side of captivity

Last week we launched our major new campaign to reveal and uncover the dark side...
Bottlenose dolphins © Christopher Swann

On the anniversary of the massacre of 1,423 dolphins, what’s changed?

One year ago today, 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins, including mothers with calves and pregnant females,...
Sperm whale (physeter macrocephalus) Gulf of California. The tail of a sperm whale.

To protect whales, we must stop ignoring the high seas

Almost two-thirds of the ocean, or 95% of the habitable space on Earth, are sloshing...
A dolphin plays in front of the WDC Scottish Dolphin Centre at Spey Bay

Sharing our Spey Bay stories – tell us yours

2022 is Scotland's Year of Stories, a year in which stories inspired by, created or...
Orcas in Australia

Did orcas help rescue entangled humpback whale?

Kidzone - quick links Fun Facts Our Goals Curious kids Kids blogs Fantastic fundraisers Gallery...
An orca named 'Hulk' off Caithness, Scotland

My amazing week watching orcas in Scotland

Orca Watch's 10th anniversary event in the far north of Scotland was exhilarating with a...

Faroes dolphin hunt review – disappointing is an understatement

I wasn't alone in hoping that substantial changes would be made as a result of...
Minke whale - V Mignon

We told them this would happen! Time to halt cruel whale experiments

An ill-conceived and so far ill-fated joint US/ Norwegian experiment to test minke whales' reaction...

A Whale of a welcome

It’s been two weeks since I arrived at the WDC North America office here in Plymouth, Massachusetts. I’m normally based at the UK office, but I’m lucky to be here on sabbatical assisting on the studies of the whales in Cape Cod, particularly humpback whales.

After being taught the data collection techniques, which is very similar to the methodology we use for the Bardsey Island Risso’s research, I have been fortunate enough to spend most of my time on  Whale SENSE accredited commercial whale watching boats recording different species of whales and other wildlife that we see. Every trip has exceeded expectations.

So far, I have seen a number of individual humpback whales and a variety of different behaviours. For humpback whales, we can tell individuals apart as each whale has a unique black and white pattern on the underside of his/her tail. When they dive down, they show us this part of their tail; we take a picture of it, and then can match it to a whale in WDC-NA’s humpback whale catalogue.   

I’ve seen an adult male named Rocker doing some very impressive tail waving before every dive, another curious humpback started spy hopping right next to the boat and a few different individuals have been flipper slapping on different trips. On one trip I was delighted, as was everyone else on board the boat, when one of the humpbacks started breaching a number of times! This whale would then take a few breaths before doing some flipper slapping, before returning to breaching. I think we had a total of 15 breaches, a very rare sight to see as these whales are in this area to gain weight and conserve energy for their migration to the Caribbean to mate and have calves.

I was also fortunate to see kick feeding, a behaviour used for feeding where the whales slap the surface of the water with their tails first and then blow bubbles to corral bait fish together. This behaviour is unique to humpback whales who feed in the Gulf of Maine off the coast of New England.

WDC has been studying and protecting the whales of Cape Cod since 2005 but research on this population dates back to the 1950s.  Gulf of Maine humpback whales were among the first whales to be individually identified and named starting in the 1970s making these whales one of the most studied population of humpbacks in the world.

 The data are essential in understanding how whales use a habitat e.g. is it for feeding and rearing their calves or for mating and giving birth?;  which areas are preferred at different times of year and any changes to these patterns?; and most importantly, are they safe from human threats in their preferred habitats.  Working collaboratively with other researchers in the area, WDC uses these data to protect whales from the impacts of ship strikes as well entanglement in fishing gear, two of the biggest threats to whales in this area.

About Vicki James

Policy officer - Stop Whaling