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Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...
Southern resident orca_CWR_Rob Lott

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...

More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...
captive dolphin

Las Vegas dolphin facility to close

Siegfried & Roy's Secret Garden and Dolphin Habitat in Las Vegas is to permanently close....

Fossil helps fill ancient whale knowledge gap

A new study in Australia by the Monash School of Biological Sciences of a whale fossil found in Peru has provided fresh information on the origins of baleen whales, helping to connect whales living today with their evolutionary past.

The new whale (Tiucetus rosae) bridges the gap between a family known as cetotheriids – today represented by the living pygmy right whale  and a group of ancient whales living 10 to 25 million years ago about which little is known.

 

Study author, Dr Felix Marx said; “We know from DNA and morphological studies how the living baleen whale families relate to each other, but the looks and whereabouts of their earliest ancestors remain largely in the dark. Our new whale is starting to change that, by filling in the blanks.”

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