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Darwin Initiative boosts whale and dolphin protection work in Senegal

Darwin Initiative boosts whale and dolphin protection work in Senegal

WDC's work to protect significant numbers of whales and dolphins dying in fishing nets and...
WDC is ‘on a roll’ with cheeky new partnership

WDC is ‘on a roll’ with cheeky new partnership

Photo by Hal Sato We’re thrilled to announce a new partnership with leading sustainable toilet...
EU legal action against France, Spain and Sweden a big step in WDC’s campaign to stop death in nets

EU legal action against France, Spain and Sweden a big step in WDC’s campaign to stop death in nets

The European Commission has demanded that France, Spain and Sweden take immediate action to prevent the needless...
Beluga sanctuary update

Beluga sanctuary update

Update: 1st July 2020 We have been working to relocate belugas, Little Grey and Little...

Whale snot secrets revealed by flying robot

Scientists have come up with a novel way of collecting data in order to understand more about whales. The SnotBot is a small drone that can hover over a whale and then collect samples of snot, or whale blow as it is more accurately named. The drones are equipped with petri dishes and can retrieve the particles exhaled through the whale’s blowhole as the creature comes up for air.

When studied in detail, whale blow can reveal information about the whale’s DNA, metabolism, health, hormones and stress. The SnotBot is also equipped with cameras and microphones to collect a range of other valuable data.

This kind of non-invasive research is in stark contrast to the whale research undertaken by Japan, whose vessels have just left port once again to kill whales so that they can be dissected and supposedly studied for scientific reasons.

Distinctive colour of blue whale