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Leaping harbour porpoise

Experts identify ocean areas requiring urgent conservation measures

Scientists and marine experts from around the world have set out new Important Marine Mammal...
Humpback whale (megaptera novaeangliae) Humpback whale. Tonga.

Increased protected ocean area a boost for whale populations

Protections in the South Atlantic Ocean for one of the largest and most important marine...
Humpback whale with calf

Scientists solve mystery of whale song

One of the big mysteries surrounding exactly how some of the great whales are able...
Common dolphin (delphinus delphis) Gulf of California Mexico.

Alpha Travel Insurance supports WDC’s journey to save and protect whales and dolphins across the globe

Alpha Travel Insurance is inspiring globe trotters to make more sustainable choices wherever their adventure...

Did toxic algae kill whales in Alaska

Officials from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say that algal toxins associated with warming surface waters could have been the reason behind the mass deaths of 44 whales in 2015 in the Gulf of Alaska.

A similar event happened in waters near the Canadian province of British Columbia around the same time and those whales that died were later found to have consumed algal toxins. Testing on the whales that died in Alaska waters we not possible because many of the whales had decomposed or could not be retrieved.

Researchers say that it is possible that the whales may have died as a result of collisions with vessels or infectious diseases.

The large numbers of whales, dolphins and porpoises found dead or stranded around the world’s coastlines each year are often helpless, and usually die within a few hours or days if not attended to in the right way. Help WDC’s strandings work by donating today.