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Mystery surrounds large number of whales washing up in US

Whale tail injured by ship strike A number of whales have washed up on the...

US government refuses to shield endangered right whales from lethal ship collisions

The Biden administration in the US has denied an emergency petition that seeks to protect...

Automated cruelty – vending machines in Japan now dispense dead whale

In an effort to prop up the cruel and declining whale hunting industry in Japan,...

The Yogscast raises an ocean-sized donation for WDC

The New Year started with a bang for whales and dolphins thanks to Bristol-based gaming...

Did toxic algae kill whales in Alaska

Officials from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say that algal toxins associated with warming surface waters could have been the reason behind the mass deaths of 44 whales in 2015 in the Gulf of Alaska.

A similar event happened in waters near the Canadian province of British Columbia around the same time and those whales that died were later found to have consumed algal toxins. Testing on the whales that died in Alaska waters we not possible because many of the whales had decomposed or could not be retrieved.

Researchers say that it is possible that the whales may have died as a result of collisions with vessels or infectious diseases.

The large numbers of whales, dolphins and porpoises found dead or stranded around the world’s coastlines each year are often helpless, and usually die within a few hours or days if not attended to in the right way. Help WDC’s strandings work by donating today.