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Common dolphin (delphinus delphis) Gulf of California Mexico.

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Bianca Cisternino Bianca is WDC's bycatch coordinator. She leads our work to protect whales and...
Lottie and Ed outside the Norwegian parliament

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Humpback whale playing with kelp

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Alison Wood Ali is WDC's education projects coordinator. She is the editor of Splash! and KIDZONE,...

How to beat the January blues? Book a whale watch trip!

I’m sure I’m not the only person shivering through dismal January days – and equally dismal events on the world stage – and seeking solace in the prospect of planning my next escape from routine: preferably somewhere with stunning landscapes and wildlife.

Step forward Oliver Dirr, keen traveller and whale watcher, whose recent travels with his wife, Theresa, inspired them to create a website  and a ‘Whaleplanner’.  This brilliant-looking month-by-month guide to some of the best whale watching opportunities around the world has already inspired me and will hopefully inspire you, too, to book an adventure or two this coming year!

As Oliver commented: “My wife, Theresa, and I travelled a lot in the last few years and mostly it was about whales.  We’ve been to Iceland, Greenland, Canada (Quebec and Vancouver Island), New Zealand and Australia (Queensland and New South Wales) and we were lucky enough to see humpbacks, orcas, sperm whales, fin whales, minke whales, blue whales and belugas. Some sightings were from land, some on a tour with a group of researchers and some via regular whale watching tours.  We’ve learned a lot about whale watching during our trips and we still think it can have a positive impact if it’s done properly. Unfortunately, we’ve seen some operators who really missed their chance to delight the people on board. Through our website, we want to inspire people to just get out there and see the whales with their own eyes. But we also want them to know how to choose a good operator and how to have a rich experience.”

Look out for a series of guest blogs on Oliver and Theresa’s whale watch adventures this spring  – but meanwhile, why not dive into the Whaleplanner and get inspired!

For more information on responsible whale watching, check out also our new guide.