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A dolphin trapped in a fishing net

Study raises concern about methods used to stop dolphins being caught in nets

Dolphins and porpoises continue to die in huge numbers in fishing gear but even some...
Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

With the very real prospect of Iceland's only fin whale hunter, Kristján Loftsson sending boats...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...

Chinese plans to capture endangered whales and dolphins off Namibia subside

According to latest reports, the company that owns a trawler linked to the possible capture of whales and dolphins off the coast of Namibia has decided not to pursue these plans, and will leave Namibian waters shortly.

The controversial Chinese trawler, Ryazanovka, had spent recent days refuelling and storing fuel supplies at Walvis Bay’s main port after being named in some reports as the vessel that was to be used to capture and transport live and endangered marine mammals to Chinese aquariums.

The Namibian fisheries ministry had remained silent over the granting of a capture permit to the Chinese company, Welwitschia Aquatic and Wildlife Scientific Research.

The company put in a request several months ago to export a number of internationally listed vulnerable wild dolphins, whales and African penguins, among other species, to Chinese aquariums using the trawler, Ryazanovka.