Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching

More help for entangled whales thanks to project funding

A project to stop whale entanglement in fishing gear has received a huge boost thanks...

Iceland to monitor whale hunt cruelty

Following our call for an investigation into violations of the Icelandic Whaling and Animal Welfare...
Beluga whales in the wild

Beluga whale in River Seine dies after rescue attempt

A beluga whale that became trapped in the River Seine in France has sadly had...
Tilikum, the father of Nakai. © Paul Wigmore

Orca Nakai dies at SeaWorld San Diego

SeaWorld San Diego has announced the death of the orca Nakai. The 20-year-old male orca...

Satellite tag infection kills endangered orca

A male orca from an endangered orca community has died following an infection caused by a research satellite tag.

The orca, known by the ID number L95, belonged to the shrinking Southern Resident orca population. L95 was found dead around a month after scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the US scientific agency responsible for recovery of the Southern Residents, tagged him earlier this year.

Investigations into the cause of death revealed small pieces of the tag hardware in the tissue of L95’s dorsal fin, which probably caused a fungal infection, and ultimately led to his death

NOAA researchers have been tracking the Southern Resident orcas to gather more information on where they travel during the winter in an effort to help this endangered group. Tagging efforts were stopped after L95 was found, and will not continue in the near future. 

According to Colleen Weiler, WDC’s Jessica Rekos Fellow for Orca Conservation, “The intent of the project was to gather data to enhance protections for this threatened population, but it has resulted in a tragic loss.  We applaud NOAA’s decision to halt this tagging program, and urge the Agency to use existing data to expand designated critical habitat before it’s too late.”