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50-Year Vision launched to save whales and dolphins from extinction

WDC has joined the world's leading wildlife protection and conservation organisations urging the 88 member...

Lone beluga death a warning to stay clear

A lone beluga whale that has spent the past two years living close to shore...
Common bottlenose dolphin

New law looks set to ban dolphin shows in France

New legislation in France is set to ban dolphin shows in two years time as...

Deloitte chooses WDC as charity partner to help save whales and save the planet

We are delighted to announce that Whale and Dolphin Conservation has been chosen as a...

Dolphin with broken blowhole learns to breathe through mouth

A New Zealand dolphin has amazed researchers in New Zealand by adapting to breathe through his or her mouth after she or he was unable to use the blowhole, according to a report in Marine Mammal Science.

Whereas humans have the option to either use their nose or mouth, dolphins have evolved to just use their blowhole. It is unclear why this dolphin was unable to, possibly it developed incorrectly, but it seems to have adapted without any problems and is thriving. While dolphins are known to be able to blow bubbles, this is the first time one has actually been recorded breathing in this way, which requires the dolphin to move the position of its larynx according to the research. 

Citation: Dawson, S. M., Fordyce, R. E., Ridgway, S. H., Brough, T. E. and Slooten, E. (2016), Observations of a New Zealand dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori) breathing via its mouth. Mar Mam Sci. doi:10.1111/mms.12349

About George Berry

George is a member of WDC's Communications team and website coordinator.