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Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...
Southern resident orca_CWR_Rob Lott

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...

More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...
captive dolphin

Las Vegas dolphin facility to close

Siegfried & Roy's Secret Garden and Dolphin Habitat in Las Vegas is to permanently close....

Whale calls recorded at deepest point of the Earth’s surface

The first audio recordings taken from the deepest point on the Earth’s surface have reveal a number of amazing sounds, including the calls of different species of whale. 

Little is known about what happens in the Mariana Trench, located at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean around 322 km (200 miles) southwest of Guam, but the recording do shed some light on what is a dark place (where the sun never shines).

The crushing pressure levels at such extreme depths prevent in-depth exploration and so a team from US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) decided to listen in at least by dropping a titanium-encased recording device (hydrophone) down to Challenger Deep, the trench’s deepest point.

Aside from whale song, over a 23 day period the researchers recorded the propeller of a boat travelling across the surface 10.9 km (6.7 miles) away, the sound of a typhoon raging overhead and the rumbling of earthquakes.

Listen to whale calls before and after an earthquake

The purpose of the research work is to help determine if human-created noise in the ocean is getting louder, and so measure the impact on marine animals that use sound to communicate, navigate and feed, such as whales and dolphins.

Find out more about the impact of noise pollution and WDC’s work on this issue