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A dolphin trapped in a fishing net

Study raises concern about methods used to stop dolphins being caught in nets

Dolphins and porpoises continue to die in huge numbers in fishing gear but even some...
Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

With the very real prospect of Iceland's only fin whale hunter, Kristján Loftsson sending boats...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...

The BBC, whale hunting and Japan’s stubborn refusal to let go of a bloody ‘tradition’

Read and watch the BBC’s reporter in Asia, Rupert Wingfield- Hayes, as he goes to a Japanese market to buy whale meat, ‘tastes’ it, and gets the views and opinions of someone who ate it as a child but has now stopped.

WDC applauds this investigation; which gets to the heart of why Japan continues to whale.

Japan has a limited tradition of small type coastal whaling which can´t really be described as ‘part of Japanese culture’.

Iceland´s whaling history is actually quite brief.  Organised whaling operations didn´t start until the beginning of the 20th century. While Norway does have a longer tradition, the infamous commercial whaling operations mostly took part in the 19th and 20th century as well. These days, whaling doesn´t play an important part in the cultural lives of any of these countries and demand for whale meat continues to fall. 

Help WDC stop whaling