Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Kids blogs
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
tins of whale meat

How Japan’s whaling industry is trying to convince people to eat whales

Japan's hunters kill hundreds of whales every year despite the fact that hardly anyone in...
Common dolphins © Christopher Swann

Did you know dolphins have personalities?

Kidzone - quick links Fun Facts Our Goals Curious kids Kids blogs Fantastic fundraisers Gallery...
Microplastics on beach

Blue whales and the menace of microplastics – how we’ll solve this problem

Our love affair with plastic began in the 1950s when it revolutionised manufacturing. But what...
A dolphin called Arnie with his shell.

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...
The Last Whale

The Last Whale – your chance to win a copy of new book

Kidzone - quick links Fun Facts Our Goals Curious kids Kids blogs Fantastic fundraisers Gallery...

The things we do at WDC Australasia

Our Manager of Science & Education in Australasia, Dr. Mike Bossley, will retire at the end of the month after over 12 years of dedicated work for WDC.

Mike BossleyMike is conservationist and scientist with all his heart. During most of his early life he worked as a university lecturer, while moonlighting for environmental groups. He has published a number of scientific papers and given many presentations at international conferences. Mike served on the Australian government International Whaling Commission (IWC) delegation for six years and made many submissions to governments on various conservation issues. He also has been studying the dolphins in Adelaide for 25 years, using the non invasive photo ID method. The study documents various human impacts on the dolphins and also the spread of “tail walking” through the local population, an example of cultural behaviour (see video below). Awards he received throughout his career include Australian of the Year for South Australia, the Australian Centenary Medal and the Order of Australia for services to marine conservation. We are very grateful for all his work and dedication and are happy that Mike will stay with us as a part time consultant, working on the NZ Dolphin campaign! In his last blog, he briefly talks about a typical week in his lead role at our Australian office:

Some people may have wondered what kind of things people who work for WDC do. The answer is that we all do different things depending on the projects we are working on but this is what I have been doing during this past week.

Stranding workshopIt started with running a workshop on how to deal with a whale or dolphin stranding on Kangaroo Island; worked on a scientific paper which demonstrates the success of the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary; worked up a contract for a consultant to assist us with improving protection for the endangered NZ dolphins; worked on a scientific paper describing the cultural behaviour of tail walking in the local dolphins; corresponded with fellow conservationists and scientists in various parts of the world; mended my old wetsuit and carried out maintenance on my boat; undertaken a boat based survey to document the local dolphins and ensure none were in trouble; and pondered the return to local waters of local dolphin, Roman, who had been missing for eight years and who was presumed dead.