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Risso's dolphin at surface

My lucky number – 13 years studying amazing Risso’s dolphins

Everything we learn about the Risso's dolphins off the coast of Scotland amazes us and...
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whale (balaenoptera physalus) Three fin whales Gulf of California.

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Orca (ID171) breaches off the coast of Scotland © Steve Truluck.

Watching whales and dolphins in the wild can be life changing

Whales and dolphins are too intelligent, too large and too mobile to ever thrive in...

Orca Watch in Scotland …the results are in

The WDC team has now left Scotland and the beautiful Caithness coastline but the sightings continue.

During our week in the far north we were fortunate enough to see orcas, humpback whales, minke whales and harbour porpoise from our vantage point at Duncansby Head, just two miles from John O Groats.

Other keen whale watchers stationed at strategic points along the coast such as Noss Head, Strathy Point and Dunnet Head had similar encounters.

There was so much enthusiasm and excitement from locals and visitors alike whenever there were whales passing and not even the unpredictable Scottish weather could dampen anyone’s spirit.

Orcas are typically seen in this region from April to July but are also recorded in other months too.

Certain individuals in this area have been identified as being a part of the Icelandic herring-eating population and have made the 900 mile journey south presumably to coincide with the local seal pupping season.

The dedicated local Sea Watch Foundation Coordinator has compiled the following sightings data for the Caithness region since early April.

Huge thanks to Colin Bird and Anna Jemmett for so generously sharing all their sightings data here.

Thanks also to Sam L, Liz S, Margaux D, Andy S, Katie D, Trish C and Karen M for making the week extremely enjoyable and so rewarding.

See you in 2016.