Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Kids blogs
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
WDC's Ed Fox, Chris Butler-Stroud and Carla Boreham take a message from the ocean to parliament

Taking a message from the ocean to parliament

It's a sad fact that whales and dolphins don't vote in human elections, but I...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Tokitae in captivity

Talking to TUI – will they stop supporting whale and dolphin captivity?

Last Thursday I travelled to Berlin for a long-anticipated meeting with TUI senior executives. I...

Earth Day Q&A with Waipapa Bay Wines’ marketing director, Fran Draper

We've been partnered with Waipapa Bay Wines since 2019 so for this year's Earth Day,...
Orcas at the seabed

The secrets of orca beach life

Rubbing on smooth pebbles is a generations-old cultural tradition for a particular group of orcas...

NGOs critical of new advice to prevent corkscrew injuries in seals

WDC and 19 other concerned welfare and conservation organisations are concerned that changing advice to stop mitigation to prevent any seal corkscrew injuries (so-called because of their spiral-like appearance) from ships propellers is premature.

We welcome the preliminary SMRU (Sea Mammal Research Unit) report, that clarifies that grey seal predation on the Isle of May has resulted in the death of some grey seal pups in a manner consistent with those previously thought to be produced by ducted propellers. Following a review of existing cases in Scotland, the report states that similar predation by grey seals is responsible for some if not most seal deaths exhibiting these injuries. However, the report also states that it would be “premature to assume that the interactions with propellers are not responsible for any of the observed corkscrew injuries”.

There is at present no evidence, or even suggestion, that grey seal males are predating similarly on adult female common seals or would be a likely cause of the many cases recorded of fatal corkscrew injuries in adult common seals. As a result, we welcome reassurance from Marine Scotland that “this evidence does not completely eliminate ship propellers” and that research into corkscrew injuries will continue. We do not currently know what focus this research will take.

The seal corkscrew injury research has emphasised the value of collecting and analysing data from marine mammal strandings, in order to identify anthropogenic threats to marine mammals over time. Common (or harbour) seals are declining at a UK level and the declines are dramatic, and very worrying, in some regions of Scotland.

Despite the uncertainty, Statutory Agencies have revised their Advice. Although the new Advice states “it would be premature to completely discount the possibility that some of the corkscrew injuries are caused by interactions with propellers” it goes on to exclude corkscrew injuries as a specific risk, therefore requiring no management. This decision is premature.

As a result, in a letter to various government departments, we continue to urgently call for a UK-wide strategy, and NGO involvement in its development to include monitoring to quantify any interactions at haul-out sites, revision of Statutory Agency guidance, so that it is clear and, critically, precautionary and a strandings network that collects and conducts post-mortem examinations of seals in all parts of the UK  (as already exists in Scotland).

In addition, we request a written historical analysis of all existing cases to date to identify cause of death wherever this is possible, publication of a report that reviews all previous work on the movement of particular vessels in relation to the location of seal carcasses with corkscrew injuries, particularly at hot spots in Norfolk and East Scotland, the application of tools (chemical markers, such as the trace of a specific antifouling agent, or cameras) to collect further and definitive evidence to assist in the investigation any seal injuries, whatever the cause and critically, that a precautionary policy should remain in place until conclusions (and inferences) have been subject to peer review. 

The conservation and welfare groups who wrote the letter:

Whale and Dolphin Conservation, British Divers Marine Life Rescue, Campaign Whale, Cornwall Seal Group, Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust, Humane Society International – UK, Marine Connection, Marine Conservation Society, MARINElife, National Trust for Scotland, OneKind, ORCA, Orkney Seal Rescue, Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, SEA LIFE Seal Sanctuaries, SEA LIFE Trust, Seal Conservation Society, Seal Protection Action Group, Skye Environmental Centre, The Wildlife Trusts.