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Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
WDC's Ed Fox, Chris Butler-Stroud and Carla Boreham take a message from the ocean to parliament

Taking a message from the ocean to parliament

It's a sad fact that whales and dolphins don't vote in human elections, but I...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Tokitae in captivity

Talking to TUI – will they stop supporting whale and dolphin captivity?

Last Thursday I travelled to Berlin for a long-anticipated meeting with TUI senior executives. I...

Earth Day Q&A with Waipapa Bay Wines’ marketing director, Fran Draper

We've been partnered with Waipapa Bay Wines since 2019 so for this year's Earth Day,...
Orcas at the seabed

The secrets of orca beach life

Rubbing on smooth pebbles is a generations-old cultural tradition for a particular group of orcas...

Is this dolphin family doomed?

Wave was one of the matriachs of the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary. She was born about 1992 and had the first (Bronny, a male) of her six calves in 2002. Her second calf (Ripple, a female) was born in 2006. Her last three calves all died and Wave disappeared after the death of her last calf in September, 2014. Wave is almost certainly dead.

Wave was famous for her tail walking and for surviving a horrendous injury in 2010.

About a week ago Ripple gave birth to her first calf, which we called Marea. We hope the calf survives but we noticed numerous lesions on thelittle dolphin’s head and we are gravely concerned, especially as Ripple was seen without the calf today.

And to add to our dismay, I just had a message that Bronny was found washed up on the shore of the Port River. At this stage we have no information on cause of death.

So in space of just a few years the death list is Wave (mother); four calves; and a “grand calf”. From a family of eight it seems there will be only two survivors. We did not manage to collect any of the dead calves but we do have Bronny’s body and we are hopeful the necropsy will give us information on the cause of death.

UPDATE: 11 February, 2015

Very sad update on our Adelaide dolphins… We did a survey today and located Ripple but there was no sign of her calf Marea. We are forced to conclude that Marea has died. There were two calves born in the Port River this summer that we know of and both have died.

To support our vital work with this fragile population and help us protect the remaining family members, please go to http://au.whales.org/adopt-port-river-dolphin