Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Kids blogs
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whale (balaenoptera physalus) Three fin whales Gulf of California.

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Orca (ID171) breaches off the coast of Scotland © Steve Truluck.

Watching whales and dolphins in the wild can be life changing

Whales and dolphins are too intelligent, too large and too mobile to ever thrive in...
Kiska the orca

Real stories from the dark side of captivity

Since we launched our campaign, we've been talking a lot about what a dark place...

Congratulations, Slick!

After a few more weeks of observation, the Center for Whale Research (CWR) believes that J16, Slick, is indeed the mother of newest Southern Resident baby J50 – making Slick the oldest orca in this population known to give birth in more than 40 years of research.  As an experienced mom, Slick is taking great care of little J50, who already looks a little bigger.

From the CWR: “J50 looked healthy and energetic… traveling next to J16 for most of the encounter… so whatever doubts remained about J16 being the mother are about gone.”


The newest Southern Resident will nurse for at least a year, staying close by Slick’s side and being looked after by her siblings and extended family.  Resident orcas live in closely-knit family groups, and offspring stay with their mothers their entire lives, helping to take care of the next generations.

As a growing baby, J50 will need lots of milk and nutrients from Slick, who in turn will need a reliable and abundant food source so she can stay healthy and keep taking care of her new little one.  Much of the Southern Residents’ way of life is transmitted through teaching and passing on knowledge – J50 will learn from her family where to travel and look for food, where to rest, where to play, what to eat, and what to avoid.

She will learn the timing of salmon runs, where to go to find large concentrations of Chinook, and how to find them in the open ocean when they’re not returning to rivers to spawn.  Help us make sure this knowledge isn’t all for nothing – sign our letter of support for removing the Klamath River dams.  Free-flowing rivers help salmon populations, a vital food source for Southern Residents.  Abundant Chinook stocks will keep Slick healthy to nurse and care for J50, and make sure J50 survives well into adulthood to have her own babies and teach them everything she has learned from her family.