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Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
WDC's Ed Fox, Chris Butler-Stroud and Carla Boreham take a message from the ocean to parliament

Taking a message from the ocean to parliament

It's a sad fact that whales and dolphins don't vote in human elections, but I...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Tokitae in captivity

Talking to TUI – will they stop supporting whale and dolphin captivity?

Last Thursday I travelled to Berlin for a long-anticipated meeting with TUI senior executives. I...

Earth Day Q&A with Waipapa Bay Wines’ marketing director, Fran Draper

We've been partnered with Waipapa Bay Wines since 2019 so for this year's Earth Day,...
Orcas at the seabed

The secrets of orca beach life

Rubbing on smooth pebbles is a generations-old cultural tradition for a particular group of orcas...

New hope for the Klamath River

When the last session of Congress failed to pass the Klamath Basin Water Recovery and Economic Restoration Act, which approves the dam removal process to begin on the Klamath River, the big question on everyone’s minds was: what now?  With a new Congress coming in, all bills still awaiting a vote went out the door with the old Congress.

The Klamath Basin Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA) took nearly a decade to come together, and removing four dams owned and operated by PacifiCorp is a significant part of that agreement.  Without Federal approval of the KHSA and its sister agreements, it was uncertain whether or not the dams would come down.

On January 8th, however – just two days into the current session of the new Congress – a new bill was introduced focusing on water in the Klamath Basin. The title is much longer and doesn’t roll off the tongue as nicely as the previous one, but the important thing is what the bill entails: approval of the Klamath Agreements and the go-ahead for the dam removal process to begin. 

Taking down these four dams (JC Boyle, Iron Gate, Copco 1, and Copco 2) will open up more than 300 miles of salmon habitat that has been blocked for nearly one hundred years.  With a free-flowing river, habitat is improved, spawning grounds are restored, are the Chinook population in the Klamath is expected to increase by up to 81%.

Southern Resident orcas, a critically endangered population, are highly dependent on Chinook salmon, another endangered species.  With declining salmon populations, the Southern Residents have suffered as well.  To save the orcas, we have to save the salmon, and trace the problem back to the source – we need a healthy ecosystem to ensure long-term recovery of the Southern Residents.

The new bill, for now let’s call it S. 133, has a long way to go before it reaches the President’s desk, so your support and signatures are now more important than ever.  The quick re-introduction of a bill to approve the Klamath plan is an encouraging sign, but the bill is currently at a standstill in the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.  We need to rally support and show our legislators that we want these dams to come down to move the bill forward in Congress.  If you’ve already signed, share our letter of support, tell your friends and family how they can help save endangered orcas, and help us spread the word – we won’t let orcas be dammed!