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Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...
We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...
Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
WDC's Ed Fox, Chris Butler-Stroud and Carla Boreham take a message from the ocean to parliament

Taking a message from the ocean to parliament

It's a sad fact that whales and dolphins don't vote in human elections, but I...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Tokitae in captivity

Talking to TUI – will they stop supporting whale and dolphin captivity?

Last Thursday I travelled to Berlin for a long-anticipated meeting with TUI senior executives. I...

Latest ’whale beer’ in Iceland: what a load of b*lls!

In what feels increasingly like a warped version of the Hokeycokey (in… out…in…out), ‘whale beer’ will once again be on sale in Iceland from January 23rd – but with an obscene twist. This time it will be flavoured by smoked fin whale testicles. Yes, really.


Whale beer #1 – January 2014

Last January, we reported on the sale of ‘Whale Beer’, brainchild of the Steðja brewery in Iceland. The launch of the beer, which contained a small amount of whale meal, was timed to coincide with the Icelandic mid-winter festival of Þorrablót (Thorrablot) in honour of the Norse god, Thor, a reinvented ‘tradition’. At the time, brewery owner, Dabjartur Arilíusson, declared: “This is a unique beer, brewed in collaboration with Hvalur hf.  Whale beer will include, among other things, whale meal.  Whale meal is very protein-rich and has almost no fat in it.  That, along with the fact that no sugar is added, makes this a very healthful drink and people will be true Vikings drinking it.”

However, before it hit the shelves, the beer was banned by the Public Health Authority in Vesturland, where the Steðja brewery is located, as the whale meal – which contained amongst other things whale intestines – failed food hygiene regulations. Days later, the Fisheries Minister overturned the ban and ruled that the beer could indeed go on sale. It rapidly sold out – but there followed a final twist in October, when the original decision of the Vesturland Public Health Authority to ban it was upheld.

Whale beer #2 – January 2015

Undeterred, the Steðja brewery announced today that it is brewing a beer using smoked fin whale testicles which will be available later this month. Aptly named Hvalur 2, the beer is a blatant plug for the source of the whale testicles – once again, Kristjan Loftsson’s fin whaling company.

In an interview with Visir today, Dabjartur Arilíusson boasted “We want to create a true Þorri (Thorri) atmosphere and therefore, we decided to use smoked testicles from fin whales for flavouring the beer. The testicles are cured according to an old Icelandic tradition, lightly salted and then smoked. We put a lot of effort into this and it’s a long process” – adding that each brewing had contained one testicle.

The Þorri festival is of course known for offering dishes which include fermented shark and smoked ram’s testicles, so offering dung-smoked whale testicle beer is clearly playing to the ‘Viking’ theme.

Is it legal?

Despite being legal this time (it appears that the use of this whale ‘product’ has been authorised by the Icelandic Food and Veterinary Authority, MAST, and Visir reports that Helgi Helgason, Director of the Vesturland Public Health Authority, has confirmed that the brewery has been authorised to sell beer brewed with whale testicles), the move is certainly highly provocative and a cheap marketing ploy, but that is nothing new for Kristjan Loftsson.

There is more to this, however, than mere sensationalism – this is a calculated move, not only to dishonour a beautiful and endangered creature by using its most intimate of body parts as a marketing tool, but also sends a clear ‘two fingers’ to the conservation community and those who love and respect whales.

And again, there’s more to this than meets the eye – beyond the hype, the reality is a man who is clinging on stubbornly to a dying industry, constantly casting around for new ways to offload his goods. Yes, it is cynical, but it is also desperate. Loftsson is likely sponsoring this beer and it will be costing him a lot of money, at a time when he is experiencing increasing difficulty in offloading whale meat, even to Japan.

Right-minded people would no sooner drink beer brewed with whale testicles than they would order similar drinks made with tiger, elephant or rhino testicles and our hope, of course, is that visitors to Iceland – a truly beautiful country with lively, friendly people – will treat this latest offering with the disdain it deserves.

Truly scraping the bottom of the barrel.

 Please join us and support our campaign to end whaling in Iceland!

Comments on this product (please be polite!) may be sent to the relevant authority:

Icelandic Food and Veterinary Authority (MAST)   www.mast.is/



About Vanessa Williams-Grey

Policy manager - Stop Whaling and Responsible Whale Watching