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Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whale (balaenoptera physalus) Three fin whales Gulf of California.

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Orca (ID171) breaches off the coast of Scotland © Steve Truluck.

Watching whales and dolphins in the wild can be life changing

Whales and dolphins are too intelligent, too large and too mobile to ever thrive in...
Kiska the orca

Real stories from the dark side of captivity

Since we launched our campaign, we've been talking a lot about what a dark place...

A Happy New Year for Orcas!

Rumors started swirling Tuesday afternoon about a possible new baby seen in J pod of the Southern Residents, and we thrilled to share the official news from the Center for Whale Research – J16, Slick, has been seen with a brand new youngster at her side!

Slick is an experienced mother who is usually seen with her three living offspring (Mike, Alki, and Echo) – at an estimated 42 years old, she was a young orca herself when the annual census began in the early 70s.

After the recent tragic death of Rhapsody, another J pod member, earlier this month and the heartbreaking loss of an L pod baby this past fall, this is a ray of hope at the end of a rough year for the Southern Residents. 

Help make 2015 a Happy New Year for these orcas and sign our petition – we won’t let the new baby be dammed!

December 31 Update: The newest addition to J pod will be designated J50, and will be given a name sometime next year.  Researchers first spotted the new baby yesterday afternoon, swimming in Slick’s slipstream, looking healthy and full of energy!