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Real lives lost – the true dolphin, porpoise and whale stories behind the bycatch statistics

Every dolphin, porpoise and whale who dies in fishing gear was an individual with their...

No more dolphin, porpoise and whale deaths in UK fishing gear – join us in saying ‘Goodbye Bycatch’

More than 1,000 dolphins, porpoises and whales die in fishing gear in UK seas every...

Whales and dolphins have flippin’ awesome support bubbles

Friends and family all get involved in bringing up the younger generation of whales and...
two underwater no border

Joy and sadness watching Hector’s dolphins in their wild place

The widening estuary is deserted...  it was not always like this - a rusting trypot...
A mother and baby Commerson's

A breath of fresh air – why I love studying beautiful Commerson’s dolphins

Lockdown in Argentina has been long and tough and so I was excited when restrictions...
© V. Mignon

Covid and conservation – how we protected whales and dolphins together in 2020

© V. Mignon As we begin a new year, our chair of trustees, Lisa Drewe,...

Robotic dolphins – an alternative for the captive dolphin industry?

A deceptively realistic robotic dolphin, made headlines recently, causing people to ask whether robots like...

Save the whales, save the world – convincing governments that whales will help us fight the climate crisis

Whales and dolphins are awesome. They are intelligent, self-aware, socially complex and they need and...

Potential breeding ground identified for the Baltic Sea harbour porpoise

After two years of data collection and two years of statistical analyses, the EU Life+-funded project SAMBAH (Static Acoustic Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Harbour Porpoise) has estimated the critically endangered Baltic Sea harbour porpoise population to approximately 450 animals.

The data – harbour porpoise echolocation signals recorded through acoustic data loggers called C-PODs – show a clear distinction between the population inhabiting the Baltic Proper, and the more abundant population in the Western Baltic, Belt Seas and Kattegat area during May – December, the months important for reproduction. The Baltic population has been found to be concentrated mainly around the Midsjö offshore banks southeast of Öland during the summer breeding season when females give birth and mating takes place. Porpoise presence in this area was previously virtually unknown.

For the first time key questions on the abundance and distribution of the unique harbour porpoise population in the Baltic Sea can be answered and the results are expected to contribute to improved conservation status of the Baltic harbour porpoise. Four hundred and fifty might sound a lot, but it’s a small population and every individual counts!

To read more about the SAMBAH project go to http://www.sambah.org/