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Mindful conservation – why we need a new respect for nature

'We should look at whales and dolphins as the indigenous people of the seas -...
tins of whale meat

How Japan’s whaling industry is trying to convince people to eat whales

Japan's hunters kill hundreds of whales every year despite the fact that hardly anyone in...
Common dolphins © Christopher Swann

Did you know dolphins have personalities?

Kidzone - quick links Fun Facts Our Goals Curious kids Kids blogs Fantastic fundraisers Gallery...
Microplastics on beach

Blue whales and the menace of microplastics – how we’ll solve this problem

Our love affair with plastic began in the 1950s when it revolutionised manufacturing. But what...
A dolphin called Arnie with his shell.

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...

Albino Risso’s dolphin among latest victims of the drive hunts

On January 17th, 2014 over 250 bottlenose dolphins were driven into the killing Cove in Taiji, Japan, prompting one of the most politically-charged responses against the drive hunts from the global community in the past decade. US Ambassador Caroline Kennedy tweeted about her concerns, claiming that these hunts were inhumane. Among the pod was a pristine, all-white (albino) juvenile bottlenose dolphin who was subsequently named Angel, and who captured the world’s attention, and is still somehow surviving in horrible conditions at the Taiji Whale Museum.

Another albino  dolphin, this time a Risso’s dolphin, has been captured in a recent drive hunt in Taiji. On Sunday, November 23rd, a pod of approximately 16 Risso’s dolphins were driven into the killing cove. Along with the white Risso’s, one other individual was taken into captivity, while 11 were killed for their meat. Three babies were reportedly taken out to sea and released, most likely never to survive without their mothers or family units. This symbolic attempt at appeasing onlookers or adhering to some misguided protocol meant to spare certain species, or certain age groups, from slaughter is nothing more than a poor attempt at public relations.

Although this dolphin has not received the attention of Angel, her plight is the same, and her chances at a long and natural life have been cut short as she has also been taken into custody for a potential lucrative sale to a Japanese facility. Although the public reaction to this drive hunt and this white dolphin has not reached the same profile as the one in January which delivered Angel to her cruel captors, each and every drive and individual dolphin involved in these hunts deserves the same attention and should elicit the same reaction from each of us—complete denunciation of these brutal offenses against dolphins.

The dolphin drive hunts are extremely cruel, involving the exhausting and traumatic driving from the open ocean that can separate mothers and calves and other family groups, to confinement in a netted cove where the dolphins are crudely slaughtered. Last year, at least 834 dolphins were killed in the drive hunts, and 158 taken alive into captivity. So far this 2014-2015 season and of a total allowable quota of 1,938 dolphins, 198 dolphins have been slaughtered and 11 have been taken alive into captivity.

Please support our campaign to stop the dolphin drive hunts.