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Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
WDC's Ed Fox, Chris Butler-Stroud and Carla Boreham take a message from the ocean to parliament

Taking a message from the ocean to parliament

It's a sad fact that whales and dolphins don't vote in human elections, but I...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Tokitae in captivity

Talking to TUI – will they stop supporting whale and dolphin captivity?

Last Thursday I travelled to Berlin for a long-anticipated meeting with TUI senior executives. I...

Earth Day Q&A with Waipapa Bay Wines’ marketing director, Fran Draper

We've been partnered with Waipapa Bay Wines since 2019 so for this year's Earth Day,...
Orcas at the seabed

The secrets of orca beach life

Rubbing on smooth pebbles is a generations-old cultural tradition for a particular group of orcas...

Where is Wave?

Some worrying news from WDC’s dolphin adoption programme in Adelaide, Australia…

Port River resident Wave has not been seen since mid-September and anxiety is mounting among local dolphin watchers.

Wave was sighted with a very small dead calf we suspect was still born on September 10 and, as is normal in the species, protected it for several days before abandoning it. Unfortunately, the calf’s body was never found so we have no way of knowing why it died. This death means Wave’s last three calves have all died.

The death of the calf is concern enough but Wave is very much a Port River regular so her disappearance is doubly troubling. I was out in my boat yesterday doing a survey and still no sign of her.

Wave has had an eventful life. Her first three calves all survived but when her most recent surviving calf Tallula was only a year old they both suffered extreme burn like injuries, probably bad sunburn from being stranded on a mud bank. The injuries would almost certainly have killed a terrestrial mammal but marine mammals show an amazing ability to recover from flesh wounds and both mum and calf survived. Although both their wounds healed Wave still bears the scar as an elongated white patch on her right flank.

Wave’s other claim to fame is that she learned tail walking from the late Port River matriarch Billie. Tail walking occurs from time to time in other dolphin communities but its prevalence and in the Port River appears to be unique. Several other adult females tail walk from time to time but none with the regularity displayed by Wave. If she is no more it will mean both the loss of a much loved dolphin and the possible disappearance of this spectacular behaviour. Find out more about adopting a Port River dolphin.