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Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

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Fin whale (balaenoptera physalus) Three fin whales Gulf of California.

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The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Orca (ID171) breaches off the coast of Scotland © Steve Truluck.

Watching whales and dolphins in the wild can be life changing

Whales and dolphins are too intelligent, too large and too mobile to ever thrive in...
Kiska the orca

Real stories from the dark side of captivity

Since we launched our campaign, we've been talking a lot about what a dark place...

Did Politics trump human safety in Iceland?

WhalbeerOur colleague Vanessa wrote some months ago that it was highly suspicious that the Icelandic Ministry of Fisheries has overidden health officials to allow the sale of whale beer in Iceland.

It now appears that after some eight months after the supplies of the beer ran out, the Ministry of Industries and Innovation has ruled that the sale of whale beer should be banned.

The Reykjavík Grapevive is reporting that the whale beer should have been stopped’. 

RÚV reports that the Ministry has ruled that it was right for the West Iceland Health Supervisory Authority to place a ban on the beer, which counted amongst its ingredients traces of “whale meal” – powdered whale parts made mostly from bone. In the Ministry’s opinion, whale hunting company Hvalur hf. did not have the legal authority to sell whale meal to brewery Steðji.’

So, WDC is asking, why did Minister of Fisheries and Agriculture Sigurður Ingi Jóhannsson override the West Iceland Supervisory Authority? Why did the Ministry put the interests of a small goup of people who benefit from whaling over the interests of all Icelanders and visitors?

The Fisheries Ministry maintains that it was safe to sell the beer, but one is left asking the question of whether the loyalty of the Fisheries Ministry to a minority with commercial interests is more important  than the views of the Icelandic health authorities?