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Mindful conservation – why we need a new respect for nature

'We should look at whales and dolphins as the indigenous people of the seas -...
tins of whale meat

How Japan’s whaling industry is trying to convince people to eat whales

Japan's hunters kill hundreds of whales every year despite the fact that hardly anyone in...
Common dolphins © Christopher Swann

Did you know dolphins have personalities?

Kidzone - quick links Fun Facts Our Goals Curious kids Kids blogs Fantastic fundraisers Gallery...
Microplastics on beach

Blue whales and the menace of microplastics – how we’ll solve this problem

Our love affair with plastic began in the 1950s when it revolutionised manufacturing. But what...
A dolphin called Arnie with his shell.

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...

Ringing in the (wildlife) changes at the Scottish Dolphin Centre

Volunteering as a guide at the Scottish Dolphin Centre this summer, I’ve gotten used to telling visitors that we’ve been seeing the Moray Firth bottlenose dolphins at least once a day, with often spectacular displays of breaching.  However, as the summer is making way for autumn and the salmon are running a little less, I’ve found my sightings of them to be less often and less exuberant.  That’s not to say they aren’t making delightful appearances (such as earlier this week – at least ten dolphins swimming and splashing their way past Spey Bay), but now each one to me becomes that bit more special as, in two short months, I’ll be leaving this amazing place and saying see you later (definitely not goodbye!) to the largest bottlenose dolphins in the world.

When we carry out our shorewatches at Spey Bay, as well as any dolphin sightings, we also record any ospreys that we see.  My last sighting of one was on the 1st September and will likely be one of my last as they are now starting to make their long journey back to Africa for the winter.  Watching these stunning birds hovering at great height, then swooping down for (hopefully) a successful fish catch is always a thrill and I wish them well on their long flight south.

Although the dolphins might be the reason for WDC being here at Spey Bay, as many of the other centre volunteers’ blogs have shown, the other wildlife to be seen and enjoyed is just as great. Just recently we ran a Twilight Walk to discover what life wakes up after the sun goes down.  The evening was a great success, with encounters of bats, moths, deer and even the haunting call of a tawny owl!

With the first hints of autumn in the air the wildlife around here is changing; some creatures are on their way to pastures new and others will be coming back to revisit their winter homes, all of which I’m looking forward to experiencing at Spey Bay.

About George Berry

George is a member of WDC's Communications team and website coordinator.