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Mindful conservation – why we need a new respect for nature

'We should look at whales and dolphins as the indigenous people of the seas -...
tins of whale meat

How Japan’s whaling industry is trying to convince people to eat whales

Japan's hunters kill hundreds of whales every year despite the fact that hardly anyone in...
Common dolphins © Christopher Swann

Did you know dolphins have personalities?

Kidzone - quick links Fun Facts Our Goals Curious kids Kids blogs Fantastic fundraisers Gallery...
Microplastics on beach

Blue whales and the menace of microplastics – how we’ll solve this problem

Our love affair with plastic began in the 1950s when it revolutionised manufacturing. But what...
A dolphin called Arnie with his shell.

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...

WDC raises plight of New Zealand dolphin at scientific meeting

WDC has a small but hardworking team at the Biennial meeting of the Marine Mammal Society taking place this week at the University of Otago, in Dunedin, NZ. At the meeting are Erich Hoyt from the UK, Philippa Brakes from NZ and Mike Bossley based in Australia, all of whom have been involved in presenting cetacean conservation material to the conference.

The Biennial is the most important meeting for marine mammal scientists and over a thousand from all over the world are attending this meeting. This provides an important opportunity for us to network with scientists performing important cetacean conservation work, as well as to meet with other NGOs working on cetacean conservation.

Much of our WDC activity has focussed on drawing attention to the plight of the New Zealand Dolphin, whose population is plummeting from being drowned in set nets and trawls. These dolphins could be saved if fishers used alternative techniques. Prior to the meeting we commissioned research which reveals that the people of NZ are fully prepared to pay extra for their fish and chips if it means the dolphins are protected, so there is no excuse not to change fishing methods.

On Tuesday next week WDC will be running a workshop for NZ politicians and policy makers to explore practical ways to implement protection measures.

New Zealand Dolphins (sometimes called Hectors and Mauis dolphins) are found only in New Zealand and are one of the smallest dolphins in the world.