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Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
WDC's Ed Fox, Chris Butler-Stroud and Carla Boreham take a message from the ocean to parliament

Taking a message from the ocean to parliament

It's a sad fact that whales and dolphins don't vote in human elections, but I...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Tokitae in captivity

Talking to TUI – will they stop supporting whale and dolphin captivity?

Last Thursday I travelled to Berlin for a long-anticipated meeting with TUI senior executives. I...

Earth Day Q&A with Waipapa Bay Wines’ marketing director, Fran Draper

We've been partnered with Waipapa Bay Wines since 2019 so for this year's Earth Day,...
Orcas at the seabed

The secrets of orca beach life

Rubbing on smooth pebbles is a generations-old cultural tradition for a particular group of orcas...

Call on Antigua and Barbuda to ban dolphin captivity!

Unlike many other countries in the Caribbean, the dual-island nation Antigua and Barbuda has no captive dolphins. This was not the case several years ago, when a captive dolphin facility operated at Marina Bay in Antigua. It opened in 2001, run by Dolphin Fantaseas, displaying three bottlenose dolphins that had been captured in Cuban waters. In June 2004, the facility was taken over by Dolphin Discovery, a Mexican-based company that operates a number of swim-with-the-dolphins attractions in the Caribbean and further dolphins were imported from Mexico, reportedly also originating from the wild in Cuba.

When the facility was inspected in September 2004, nine dolphins were found living in deplorable conditions. The enclosure was only eight feet deep at its deepest end. The dolphins had no access to shade from the sun and many had unusually dark skin, as a result of sunburn. The facility had also caused numerous environmental problems to the local area. The natural water flow from an adjacent salt pond was restricted by the facility which intentionally obstructed the drainage when it built the facility. As a result, the pond overflowed when heavy rain set in, affecting businesses and private property in the area with contaminated water. Dolphin Discovery were repeatedly asked to move the dolphins to another location in Antigua, but these requests were ignored.

The facility finally closed later that year, with the animals moved to the Dolphin Discovery facility in Tortola in November 2004. Dolphin Discovery was denied a permit to return to Antigua & Barbuda in April 2005.

Now, another captive dolphin chain, Dolphin Cove, has expressed an interest in developing a facility in Antigua and this has been met with a flurry of opposition, including the development of a petition, calling on the government to implement legislation to ban dolphin captivity in the country. Please support this campaign as WDC is doing, and add your signature of support.

 

About Cathy Williamson

Cathy Williamson was policy manager of our End Captivity Programme until July 2021.