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Humpback whale. Image: Christopher Swann

A story about whales and humans

As well as working for WDC, I write books for young people. Stories; about the...
Risso's dolphin at surface

My lucky number – 13 years studying amazing Risso’s dolphins

Everything we learn about the Risso's dolphins off the coast of Scotland amazes us and...
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whale (balaenoptera physalus) Three fin whales Gulf of California.

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...

Baby Beluga, oh, baby Beluga

“Baby beluga in the deep blue sea, swim so wild and you swim so free…”

 Baby belugas stay with mom for a long time in the wild, nursing for up to two years and continuing to associate with them for many years after.  Adult belugas are highly social and form groups consisting of a few to hundreds of individuals.

 Captive breeding programs have not been successful in captivity, with a survival rate of less than 50%.  The calves that survive are shipped between oceanaria to supplement captive stocks, separated from their mothers and forced into artificially formed social groups.

 This week, WDC is asking Georgia Aquarium sponsor Coca-Cola to extend their family focus to belugas.  Last week, AT&T removed comments from their Facebook page (good job!), so now we’re going straight to the source with a direct email to Coke to let them know:

Coca-Cola, you strive to protect the Arctic for polar bears – protect it for all species, and protect the species that live there! Say NO to sponsoring the Georgia Aquarium! Wild Russian belugas don’t belong in captive US tanks!”

 

Check back next week for a new beluga fact & another action alert, and thank you for helping keep belugas safe and free!