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Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
WDC's Ed Fox, Chris Butler-Stroud and Carla Boreham take a message from the ocean to parliament

Taking a message from the ocean to parliament

It's a sad fact that whales and dolphins don't vote in human elections, but I...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Tokitae in captivity

Talking to TUI – will they stop supporting whale and dolphin captivity?

Last Thursday I travelled to Berlin for a long-anticipated meeting with TUI senior executives. I...

Earth Day Q&A with Waipapa Bay Wines’ marketing director, Fran Draper

We've been partnered with Waipapa Bay Wines since 2019 so for this year's Earth Day,...
Orcas at the seabed

The secrets of orca beach life

Rubbing on smooth pebbles is a generations-old cultural tradition for a particular group of orcas...

Baby Beluga, oh, baby Beluga

“Baby beluga in the deep blue sea, swim so wild and you swim so free…”

 Baby belugas stay with mom for a long time in the wild, nursing for up to two years and continuing to associate with them for many years after.  Adult belugas are highly social and form groups consisting of a few to hundreds of individuals.

 Captive breeding programs have not been successful in captivity, with a survival rate of less than 50%.  The calves that survive are shipped between oceanaria to supplement captive stocks, separated from their mothers and forced into artificially formed social groups.

 This week, WDC is asking Georgia Aquarium sponsor Coca-Cola to extend their family focus to belugas.  Last week, AT&T removed comments from their Facebook page (good job!), so now we’re going straight to the source with a direct email to Coke to let them know:

Coca-Cola, you strive to protect the Arctic for polar bears – protect it for all species, and protect the species that live there! Say NO to sponsoring the Georgia Aquarium! Wild Russian belugas don’t belong in captive US tanks!”

 

Check back next week for a new beluga fact & another action alert, and thank you for helping keep belugas safe and free!