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Common bottlenose dolphin

100 bottlenose dolphins hunted in Faroe Islands

This morning, (July 29th), 100 bottlenose dolphins were killed in Skálafjörður on the Faroe Islands. The...

Whales left to die in agony as grenade harpoons fail to explode

Evidence has emerged of grenade-tipped harpoons failing to explode when fired into fin whales by...

Elusive whale seen alive for the first time

Using DNA evidence, scientists have been able to officially confirm the first live sightings of...
Fin whale

Fin whales return to old feeding grounds in Southern Ocean

An exciting discovery by researchers in the waters around Antarctica suggest that fin whales are...

Fin whale death toll edges closer to a hundred in Iceland

 

Latest figures (August 12th) from the Iceland Fisheries Directorate give a total of 89 fin whales killed by Kristjan Loftsson’s fleet so far this season.

Loftsson could slaughter as many as 184 fin whales under a self-allocated quota, but the rationale behind the hunt is looking increasingly shaky. There is no domestic market for fin whale meat in Iceland and exports are proving difficult. Last month, fin whale meat destined for Japan made it as far as Hamburg before being turned back, amidst a blaze of public protests, prompting two shipping companies, Evergreen Line and Samskip, to renounce carrying any further whale meat.  

The returned containers of meat now sit in frozen storage for the foreseeable future, alongside numerous similar containers both in Iceland and Japan, and both fin and minke whalers are operating at a loss.

About Vanessa Williams-Grey

Policy manager - Stop Whaling and Responsible Whale Watching