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Third orca death in 18 months at theme park

Loro Parque tourist attraction in Tenerife, Spain has announced the death of Kohana, a 20-year-old...

WDC’s Shorewatch work shortlisted for nature award

We are thrilled that our Shorewatch programme has been shortlisted in the Citizen Science category...
Image from one of the WDC Risso's dolphin research catalogues

Local community helps piece together Risso’s dolphin puzzle

Thousands of photographs from members of the public have been published today in two WDC...

Tesco joins new initiative to help protect whales and dolphins

Tesco, the UK's largest retailer has joined WDC, Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), and the Royal Society...

Humpbacks Pass On Feeding Skills

Researchers have discovered that humpback whales in the North Atlantic have been able to pass on new feeding skills to one another.

In 1980, when one of their favourite prey, herring, became scarce, one of whales adapted their usual method of catching the fish, known as ‘bubble netting’. Switching to a new food source, the sandlance, the whale began slapping the surface of the water with its tail, which is believed to force the sandlance to leave their sea bottom home and move closer to the surface where the whale could then feed on them.

Over a period of 30 years of study, other whales also began following this new technique, now known as lobtail feeding, as they also began to feed on the sandlance, and today it is widely seen amongst humpbacks in the Gulf of Maine off Boston.

Read the full report at: Science