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Norway's dying whaling industry

It seems that despite claims that its whaling is still acceptable to Norwegians, it seems that the Norwegian public’s willingness to purchase and consume whale meat and products is still going the way of whaling all around the world – downwards at a steady rate.

http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/distrikt/nordland/1.10994696 reports that only 17 boats are actually taking up the chance to hunt whales this year, down 10% on last year (20 vessels took up the chance in 2012).

The NRK quotes fisheries commentator Knut Eirik Olsen as saying that, “the only thing that could save the industry is if the meat were to be sold in large supermarket chains, but that is not happening”.

The article makes oft repeated claims that the hunt is using sustainable quotas, but fails to note that these quotas are set unilaterally by the Norwegian Government which continues to actively seek to undermine the decision making process of the IWC.

The article notes that its getting even more difficult to find buyers for the whale meat. “CEO Ulf Ellingsen of the Ellingsen company from Skrova “Norway’s most famous buyer of whale meat”, is quoted as saying, “We will probably buy meat this year, although less than last year.”  In 2012 the company bought about 80 tons, as compared to 600 tons in the late 1970s”.

Despite the article claiming that environmentalists are no longer causing a problem for Norway WDC would like to reassure the Norwegian whaling industry that we have not forgotten them and their spurious arguments.

  • The IWC and international community has not endorsed their whaling and has not issued them quotas.
  • They remain pariahs on this issue.
  • Whaling is a dying industry that is being kept alive for political reasons rather than necessity.
  • The European fish buying market is steadily turning its back on the whalers and refusing to do business with them.

 If you want to read more on Norwegian whaling