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Common bottlenose dolphin

100 bottlenose dolphins hunted in Faroe Islands

This morning, (July 29th), 100 bottlenose dolphins were killed in Skálafjörður on the Faroe Islands. The...

Whales left to die in agony as grenade harpoons fail to explode

Evidence has emerged of grenade-tipped harpoons failing to explode when fired into fin whales by...

Elusive whale seen alive for the first time

Using DNA evidence, scientists have been able to officially confirm the first live sightings of...
Fin whale

Fin whales return to old feeding grounds in Southern Ocean

An exciting discovery by researchers in the waters around Antarctica suggest that fin whales are...

Dolphin deaths in Australia remain a mystery

Twenty four bottlenose dolphins, almost all juveniles, have died in Adelaide’s Gulf St Vincent in the past six weeks. At the same time, thousands of inshore reef fish have washed up on local beaches. The reason for these deaths remains unknown with initial analysis of some of the dead dolphins unable to determine their cause of death. Laboratory tests of tissue samples will not be completed for another two weeks.

Local waters are up to five degrees centigrade above normal for this time of the year. At this stage the most widely accepted theory for the deaths is a toxic build up of plant-like organisms called phytoplankton, often called a ‘red tide’. Although no such tide has been observed to date, it would be the first time such a toxic build up has affected dolphins in this part of the world.

 

About George Berry

George is a member of WDC's Communications team and website coordinator.