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US government refuses to shield endangered right whales from lethal ship collisions

The Biden administration in the US has denied an emergency petition that seeks to protect...

Automated cruelty – vending machines in Japan now dispense dead whale

In an effort to prop up the cruel and declining whale hunting industry in Japan,...

The Yogscast raises an ocean-sized donation for WDC

The New Year started with a bang for whales and dolphins thanks to Bristol-based gaming...
Russia captive orca NARNIA_2017_2 CREDIT Oxana Fedorova

Narnia the orca dies at Russian dolphinarium

Narnia the orca performs in Russia © Oxana Fedorova Narnia, a wild orca taken from...

The world’s rarest species of whale has been seen and photographed.  

140 years after it was first identified from a jaw bone, two spade-toothed beaked whales were found stranded on a beach in New Zealand in December 2010. But, the whales, which can grow to more than 5 metres (16 feet) long, were initially mistaken for Gray’s beaked whales and buried.

DNA samples were taken from the mother and calf which later revealed their true identity and the remains were dug up. It is thought to be the first time this species has ever been seen as a complete specimen.

Little is known about this species and it is not clear why the whales swam on to the beach.