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Icelandic hunting vessels in port

Permit delays could stop whale hunts in Iceland this summer

As whaling ships go out to hunt for another season in Norway, news from Iceland...
Blue whale tail Christopher Swann

Māori king declares rights for whales in New Zealand

New Zealand's Māori king and other native leaders across the Pacific region have signed a...
Orca-Morgan-LoroParque-2013_c_UCLudewig (1)

More success for our End Captivity campaign. Jet2holidays stops promoting dolphin shows

Jet2holidays has followed easyJet's recent announcement and become the latest major tour operator in the...
Dolphin in captivity

Tests reveal captive dolphin choked to death on fake seaweed

Nephele, a dolphin held at Kolmården Zoo in Sweden has died after a piece artificial...

Scientists in the UK have published a study that may reveal the reasons why females orcas can live for a further 50 years after having their offspring.

According to experts from the University of Exeter, the presence of mothers ensured greater survival of adult sons to an age when they can breed, and so might explain possible reasons for this long but non-reproductive phase of their lives.

Orcas have one of the longest post-reproductive life spans in the natural world and the young never leave their mothers, remaining in a single group or pod.

The research showed that, for a male over 30, the death of his mother means an almost 14-fold-increase in the likelihood of his death within the following year.

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