Whaling

115 whales killed for ‘science’

The Japanese Fisheries Agency has announced that 90 sei whales and 25 Bryde's whales have been slaughtered by its whale hunting fleet in the north western Pacific.

The annual hunts started in May  and, according to officials from the Japanese Institute of Cetacean Research the whales have been killed for scientific purposes such as studying stomach contents and taking skin samples.

New research unlocks mysteries of minke whale feeding habits

Studies of minke whales in Antarctica have revealed some more secrets about how these amazing creatures feed.

Data taken over several weeks showed the minke’s feeding in a way unique to other whales; spending most of their feeding time under the sea ice and skimming just below the frozen water, scooping up large volumes of krill.

WDC Stop Whaling campaign gets boost from European Parliament

WDC celebrates a massive achievement in our campaign to make whaling a deal-breaker in the free trade agreement negotiations between the EU and Japan.

On July 6, 2016 in Strasbourg, a majority of the members of the European parliament (MEPs) agreed on a resolution asking for stronger measures from the EU against Japanese whaling. The vote was overwhelming with 610 votes in favour, 11 against and 77 abstentions.

Fishermen kill beaked whale in Japan

Fishermen in Japan have killed the first Baird's beaked whale of the season which runs until the end of July. They have been given a quota of ten whales by the Japanese government for 2016.

The 10-metre female whale weighed around ten tonnes. WDC is very concerned about the welfare and conservation impacts of these unregulated and extremely cruel hunts.

More on whaling in Japan

European Parliament Members want more action against Japanese whaling

Members of the European Parliament have demanded stronger action by the EU against Japan’s decision to ignore international law and continue killing whales for ‘research’. 

The calls came at a meeting in Strasbourg on June 8th when Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) and representatives of the EU Council and Commission debated Japan's so-called ‘scientific’ whaling.

Japan continues to ignore international court ruling as new hunts begin

Japanese whalers have left port to start hunting whales in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. They hope to catch up to 90 sei whales and 25 Bryde's whales in hunts that are expected to last until late July, the country’s Fisheries Agency said.

Two whaling ships left Shimonoseki port on Thursday morning and the 8145-ton Nisshin Maru, the mother ship of the fleet, is scheduled to depart from a port in neighbouring Hiroshima prefecture on Friday.

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