Pollution

Natural History Museum bans sale of plastic water bottles to help fight ocean pollution

London’s Natural History Museum has taken more positive steps to counter plastic pollution in the ocean by announcing a ban on the sale of single-use plastic water bottles at its two UK sites.

The museum's main building in South Kensington, London, and premises in Tring, Hertfordshire look set to do away with bottles and offer visitors alternatives such as water fountains and reusable bottles, as well as looking at ways to encourage visitors to bring their own bottles. It has already stopped offering plastic straws.

Nearly ten percent of whales, dolphins, and porpoises examined in Ireland found to have consumed plastics

A new study published in the academic journal, Environmental Pollution has revealed the shocking reality of plastic debris polluting the ocean.

According to data compiled off the coast of Ireland by researchers at Galway-Mayo IT and University College Cork (in collaboration with IWDG), almost ten per cent of whales, dolphins, and porpoises examined were found to have plastics in their digestive tracts.

TV Stars back #NotWhaleFood

The colossal amount of plastic waste from single-use water bottles and other sources equates to more than the combined weight of every single living blue whale (the largest creature ever to have lived on earth) and equal to five grocery bags filled with plastic for every single foot of the world’s coastline. This number is set to double to 10 bags full by 2025.

Dolphins caught spitting to catch fish

Rare footage of dolphins spitting has been captured by the BBC during four years of filming beneath the world’s oceans for the new ground-breaking series, Blue Planet II.

Cameramen caught Snub Fin dolphins on camera, for what could be the first time, off the coast of Western Australia spitting into the air to trick fish into leaping from the water in order to then eat them.

The new series, which promises to be a treat for those who love marine wildlife, is set to broadcast in October.

 

A message from the deep

This blog was written by WDC interns at the Scottish Dolphin Centre; Emily, Sadie, Emma and Anna to highlight the problem of plastic pollution. They set themselves a challenge to go plastic free and here they share their experience, struggles and successes.

New solution to plastic pollution

Academics from the University of Bath have come up with a biodegradable alternative for microbeads.

Microbeads are tiny plastic particles used in beauty and skincare products and, despite the fact that bans on their use are coming into force they will continue to be washed out into the oceans, consumed by marine life which humans then eat, allowing potentially harmful effects on the body.

Scientists working at Bath University have now come up with a method to make microbeads out of cellulose, a starch found in wood and plants.

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