Dolphin hunts

Hundreds of dolphins captured in Taiji

A 'superpod' of around 300 dolphins has been captured by hunters in the cove near the infamous town of Taiji, Japan. Since their capture, the dolphins are being subject to a selection process by divers who will decide which dolphins should be sold to marine parks and those that will be slaughtered. The dolphins can fetch over £20,000 when sold to the captivity industry.

Footage of the capture, and subsequent abuse, has been live streamed by welfare groups working in Taiji in the hope that something might be done to prevent this annual slaughter.

Leading Faroese medical expert warns against eating whale meat

Chief Physician at the Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health in the Faroes, Dr. Pal Weihe has contradicted government advice and reiterated a warning to the country’s population not to eat whale meat.

High levels of pollutants like mercury, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and PFCs (perfluorinated compounds) from the world’s oceans end up in sea mammals like whales and dolphins and are eaten in the Faroe Islands, Greenland, parts of Canada and Siberia. 

Protesters call on Japanese government to end dolphin hunts

A protest by members of the public and conservation groups, including representatives from WDC, will end with a rally outside the Japanese embassy in London on the eve of another bloody season of hunting in Taiji, Japan.

Fishermen free captured dolphins

Fishermen on the Solomon islands who captured a number of wild dolphins have now set them free after negotiations with local fisheries officials.

The fishermen herded the dolphins in order to sell them to a businessman who claimed to have a licence to export the mammals to captive facilities.

All the dolphins were later allowed back out to sea after fisheries compliance officers told their captors that their actions were illegal.

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