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Keiko news...everything going well so far.


WESTMAN ISLANDS, Iceland, Posted 6:23 a.m.
October 20, 1998 -- Keiko is making the transition from pampered celebrity to creature of the wild so well that handlers say they could "Free Willy" as early as next spring.

The famous orca would first be moved to the sheltered cove where his pen is located before heading out to the open sea, KOIN 6 News reports.

In the month since moving from Oregon, Keiko has spent less time around his human trainers and more time exploring underwater and watching other sea creatures.

Makah issue hunting permit - Vancouver Sun article


The Vancouver Sun, Canadian Press, NEAH BAY, Wash. 4th Novemeber 1998

Members of the Makah tribe issued themselves a whaling permit Tuesday but the stormy Pacific kept them from using it.

The Makah Tribal Council issued a 10-day permit to whaling captain Eric Johnson to the delight of tribal members.

The permit follows a decision Sunday by U.S. authorities to lift restrictions preventing the tribe from hunting grey whales in the area.

Experts agree action plans for marine mammals in the Mediterranean


The town of Arta in Northern Greece last week (29-31 October) hosted a meeting of experts to consider the situation of marine mammals in the Mediterranean. In recognition of the many threats that these animals face in this region, two action plans have already been agreed for them: one for the highly endangered monk seals and another for all the cetaceans.

Whale and Dolphin Captivity in Canada


Canada is home to captive orcas, bottlenose dolphins and belugas and WDCS has recently been adding its voice to the anti-captivity campaign there. No wild captures of marine mammals have taken place in Canada in recent years, however, of particular concern is that there are no holding standards or regulations for marine mammals. As a result there are dolphins being displayed in a shopping mall, "West Edmonton", 8 orcas crammed into Marineland of Canada, Niagara and an orca being kept on its own.

250 pilot whales dies after stranding on Stewart Island


29-Oct-98 01:36 pm
250 PILOT WHALES DIE AFTER STRANDING ON STEWART ISLAND, NEW ZEALAND.

250 pilot whales have died after a mass stranding on Stewart Island, which is situated at the tip of New Zealands's South Island. N.Z.'s Department of Conservation consulted WDCS-funded Project Jonah, and other whale stranding experts, to help with the remaining live whales.

Scientists point to changes in the North Pacific


UPI records that scientists are saying something odd is going on in the North Pacific, but they're not sure what.

Among the significant changes reported at the annual meeting of the North Pacific Marine Science Organization in Fairbanks, Alaska, this week have been a band of algae in the Bering Sea and the spotting of whales in places were they haven't been seen in over a century.

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